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Loss of Falsetto Range

Hi there,
I am a 19 year old male, with the range of a Tenor. I have quite a large "chest range" going from about E2 to E5 (at a push, an F5 with growl), but I did not discover I had this wide range until a few months ago. Before that, my highest note I went to was around a C5 in chest voice. Due to this, I used a lot of falsetto, and I am influenced by artists such as Matt Bellamy from Muse. One of my favourite notes of his to hit in falsetto was a G#5, which up until a few months ago, was a comfortable note to hit. However, a few months ago, I got quite a bad cold, which took a while to get over, and since then, my falsetto range has diminished massively. I now find it much more difficult to utilise falsetto, and can now only really reach an E5 without my voice breaking if I try and go higher with falsetto higher. I am worried that something might have happened to my voice since I was ill, and it's worrying me that I might never get that range back. Any advice on what could have happened, and how I can work to get that range and comfort in my falsetto back?
Many thanks!

Comments

  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 14,464Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    Hi, Jake.

    We would need to hear a demo of your voice, preferably on scales rather than buried in the mix of a song, demonstrating your range and showing what is happening in these areas you are having troubles with.

    Everybody's voice is a little bit different, and many different approaches are taken to the high range. Some colds and viruses take months to recover from, as well. They just linger, but their effects can linger longer, especially if you keep trying to reach difficult notes when your vocal cords haven't recovered from the illness.

    If we can hear, rather than read a description of what's happening with your voice, we may be able to give you some specifics.

    Thanks.

    Bob
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