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Did I INJURE myself?

‘Hi,

After workout tonight, within about half an hour, I noticed a pain in my throat. It feels on the right side of the throat about 1 1/2 inches up to the right from the adams apple. Just under the skin - and if you touch the area its kind of sore.

I was trying some new songs tonight, and and least one had a lot of jumps, and I went for more twang than I normally do. I felt very energized and can now picture I over did it.

I don't feel hoarse. But is this some type of serious injury?

thanks

Comments

  • 7 Comments sorted by Votes Date Added
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 9,916Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    It's hard to picture what you are describing, but if you have a hunch that you may have overdone something, then you may certainly be right. Most of the time, if you will give it a rest, and try to avoid going to the extremes you may have gone to before you overdid it, then you will be OK. If you notice it happening again, you should see an ENT and find out what you could be doing, or what could have brought about pain. Pain is not normal and should not occur with normal singing.

    You may want to post a video and describe what you are experiencing, but only if you can do so without pain or overdoing your voice. For now, vocal rest would be good for a few days before attempting to video your issue.
  • Hi Bob,

    It was painful last night, and I applied some topical cream to it.

    Luckily, I haven't noticed the pain at all today. Although if I touch it, its slighly
    sore.

    If I had to guess, an uneducated opinion -- it would be a muscle or ligament injured from small, violent up down movements. but is that even possible?

    I will go easy on my next workouts.

    thanks

  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 9,916Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    Normally you won't feel any external muscular soreness from singing. You can "overstretch" your cords and experience what Ken calls getting "caught on the cord". That's when you feel your cartileges kind of slipping out of joint from overtensioning the cords. We avoid that by keeping the cords resilient (not letting them get dried out and unstretchy, like leather thongs) and by not forcing our voice up to notes it is not yet in good enough condition to sing. The preventions to these conditions are to stay well hydrated on water, not alcohol, and to sing within the conditioning that we have built our voices up to. Getting carried away or having a little too much fun can result in temporary setbacks. As long as we don't keep overdoing it, our voices tend to recover relatively soon.

    Going easy should keep you in a healthy place.

    Bob
  • ikingiking Posts: 79Pro
    edited August 2016 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Thanks Bob,

    I don't believe that problem is what I experienced.

    After 2 workouts now, I haven't had a recurrence of that strange pain -- knock on wood.

    I think Ive been neglecting my lower voice workout - and will get back to that.

    I thought I read somewhere about a lower voice workout/ instructional upcoming?

    thanks
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 9,916Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    I don't know of a low voice workout coming up.
  • ikingiking Posts: 79Pro
    edited August 2016 Vote Up0Vote Down
    oops , I thought I saw a post about it -- but must have been mistaken.

    no problem -- I found an old workout tape I made,

    and I'm back on track now- yeah!
  • kingsleykingsley Posts: 1Pro
    edited August 2016 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Hey did you figure out what it was? Im having the same problem and it makes no sense to me. My voice didnt become hoarse and it feels sore when i touch the top of my adams apple
  • Rest is number one. But, I think its best if the instructors respond to this.
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