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Heavy Metal kind of singing

Hello my name is Tim, from Portugal, and this is my first post. yeah :D I love a lot of the 70's/80's kind of heavy metal singing. I have subject that i keep wondering about. I listen to some recent heavy metal like Enforcer or Skull Fist, and I keep asking myself what kind of technique they use. It sounds to me like Rob Halford singing but in some diferent way. I dont know. In my songs I use high chest voice, and the songs of those bands sounds dificult to sing that way. Could you give me some advices? I finished the volume 2 and I'm ready for 3 :D Thank you very much and sorry for the bad English.



Comments

  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,314Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    They're singing in call voice, for the most part, up in the range from about A4 to E5.

    Those are high notes, and you'll have to shed a lot of the chesty-weight part of your tone to take chest/call up that high. C5 is kind of mid to low-mid for that range, with highs going to E5 and above.

    That means you need to stretch your chest voice as high as you can. You can mix a little, but these guys aren't using much mix. More of a trimmed-down chesty sound, with little to no head voice in there. If you build a timbral head voice, you can mix some of that in and it will match without sounding hooty, but you really need to get your thinned-down chest voice working as high up the scale as you can manage to do.

    You'll need to use the glottal compression method of cutting back the air that Ken lays out in Volume 3. Don't skip any bit of that. Watch it. Learn it. Do it. You MUST learn to cut back the air and the pressure to be able to withstand that kind of singing, day-after-day. You must support and hold back the air and pressure. Your cords can't do all of the work. Your diaphragm has to work to protect your cords from being battered by excessive volume, pressure, and tension.

    This is not singing for the faint-of-heart. It's muscle-metal, and you need to use that muscle to hold BACK the Blast. If you do EXACTLY what Ken says and successfully reduce your air and pressure, you can do this in a much healthier way, and manage to keep your voice for years to come.
  • TimTim Posts: 3Pro
    edited January 30
    @highmtn Thank you very much for the words and time. Its a pleasure to meet you, and you explained so well the subject that now I know what to do. I've a lot to learn thats for sure. Last year I recorded with my band an album, and I think it would be much easier for me if I used this techniques, but I've a long way I know that I will reach the kind of voice that I want. Thank you very much again, and thank you @Ken Tamplin for the awesome lessons. It would be impossible for me to sing like I do now, if it wasn't you :smiley:

    I'll leave the record here If you want to hear:
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,314Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    Really a rockin' song, @Tim. Great band, great vocals! Thanks for sharing with us!
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