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Loudness?

Hello there :smile:
I am new here and I've taken singing lessons for a year with another instructor. I'm considering taking with Ken soon.

My question is-
My voice is naturally quite loud. I don't try to be loud, I don't push to be loud, it just is. Both with singing as well as speaking.
Is it harmful to allow my voice to be loud?
If you were a couple of rooms away (doors open) from your sibling and you wanted to speak to them from your room- I can do that without "yelling". I can just consciously think about the distance, and my voice gets louder without a shouty approach.

Again, I am not straining, tensing up or pushing to be loud, it just comes out loud. I can be quiet if I'm trying to, but it's just natural to be louder above what most would call a normal speaking voice.
I've been told I'm just loud-voiced like Grace Slick haha :smile:

I know that forcing and straining can cause nodules or polyps, but what about unstrained loudness?

I would appreciate all thoughts and opinions on this. If hate to damage my voice just because something seems to come naturally to me at first.

Comments

  • 1 Comment sorted by Votes Date Added
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 10,115
    edited March 14 Vote Up0Vote Down
    Most "natural singers" that lose their voices could most likely have saved the longevity of their voices, if they had known about proper diaphragmatic support and cutting back the air as they sing. If you are able to sing through 4 or 5 hour performances in your loud voice without ever becoming hoarse, then you may be a lucky anomaly. In most cases, "loudness" is a function of air pressure, and the more air pressure you use, the more the possibility of inducing hoarseness exists.

    There are some "natural singers" that naturally have good support and good technique. Ronnie James Dio comes to mind. But most of the rest of us have to be really careful to not overdo it and give ourselves a setback. That means maintaining a sort of "governor" on our voices, much like a governor on an engine that helps to keep it from throwing a piston rod through the engine block from over-revving. It isn't much fun when our voices throw a rod.

    So are you mostly hoarseness-free after a vocal performance, or night of singing?
  • > @highmtn said:
    > Most "natural singers" that lose their voices could most likely have saved the longevity of their voices, if they had known about proper diaphragmatic support and cutting back the air as they sing. If you are able to sing through 4 or 5 hour performances in your loud voice without ever becoming hoarse, then you may be a lucky anomaly. In most cases, "loudness" is a function of air pressure, and the more air pressure you use, the more the possibility of inducing hoarseness exists.
    >
    > There are some "natural singers" that naturally have good support and good technique. Ronnie James Dio comes to mind. But most of the rest of us have to be really careful to not overdo it and give ourselves a setback. That means maintaining a sort of "governor" on our voices, much like a governor on an engine that helps to keep it from throwing a piston rod through the engine block from over-revving. It isn't much fun when our voices throw a rod.
    >
    > So are you mostly hoarseness-free after a vocal performance, or night of singing?


    Hello :)
    Well, I've never done any real performances. I sing after warm ups. I usually sing an hour and a half or so a day.
    I've only been hoarse (only slightly), after singing for said amount of time, when my allergies are really bad. Like recently. But the hoarseness doesn't seem to come from singing/vocalizing, because if my allergies are real bad that day, then I'm just groggy all day.

    So, really, other than the very first few days of taking lessons (while trying to learn support and such), Idont recall ever being hoarse/sore FROM vocalizing or singing?

    I can tone it down, but it seems to take more conscientious effort and struggle (not painful, just sort of annoying in a way?). I don't push to go full on vocal-blaster haha
    It literally just comes out strong. Head voice is still somewhat weak, but I've only started to work on it (been taking lessons off and on for about 7 months / 15-18 lessons total-ish)
    But I do know that you actually have to cut back air for head. That I do recall being told. Still getting used to how head voice feels, so I'm sort of in that space right now.

    I've experienced vocal flutter from not giving it enough air, if that shows how gently Im approaching this new head voice thing :smile:

    Thank you for your fast response, sir!

    PS:
    Apologies for any typos, working off of my device.
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