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Ken Tamplin's Singing Testimony

highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,280Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro

Attached below is a file that is written by Ken.  A lot of us have heard parts of his story, but possibly wonder how it all fits together to have fused Ken's voice into the incredible instrument it has become after all the years of training and discovery he has been through.

Here it is, all in one article, from Ken himself.  When you read the whole thing, it answers many of your questions, like "how could he possibly know that much about the voice?"

Ken's journey has been one of struggle and triumph, lows and highs, humble beginnings and amazing vocal accomplishments.  Our good fortune is that Ken isn't keeping all of his knowledge to himself.  We get to come along for the ride, and begin our own vocal journeys, following a trail blazed by Ken.  He guides us and shows us how to get to a destination that took him nearly 30 years.  There was no trail when he first passed this way.  

He's making it really easy, by comparison, for us to follow on his path.

Bob 

 

 

 

Comments

  • Asim_HussainAsim_Hussain Posts: 27Pro
    edited January 2014
    I think there might be a discrepancy in Ken's story. He wrote that he saw Tiffany on TV in 1982 or 83. If he's referring to that mall-girl, she only started to do videos a few years later. (I remember this fact because of a Bill Hicks joke. I am not, nor have I ever been, a fan of Tiffany!) 

    He must've been really down on his luck to take a 10-year-old girl's success as gospel!

    Still, it's an inspiring and reassuring story. I could also relate to the "my voice is my voice, and there's not much I can do about it"... until a great lesson with Ken a few days ago.
  • Ken TamplinKen Tamplin Posts: 428Administrator
    You're right, I was off a little on the exact dates. When I shared my "testimony" it was off  the "top of my head". (cob webs on the brain). I joined Joshua back in late 1982. I was a TV salesman in late 83 - 84. I believe Tiffany was about 13 or 14 at the time.(very young). I know this because her producer (George Tobin) was alo supposed to produce "Joshua" the band I was in several years later. (I left Joshua back in '86 so this must have been 83-84 at the latest which would have put her about 13-14 years old. Her father's name was Jim and we both worked at the PX Cameran and Appliance in Orange Count California. You can probably find out this info :-)
    Here is Tifanny's stats:

    Tiffany Renee Darwish (born October 2, 1971) is an American singer and former teen icon. She is most notable for her 1987 remake of "I Think We're Alone Now", originally recorded by Tommy James and the Shondells in 1967. Released as the second single from her eponymous album,Tiffany, the song quickly became a teen anthem.[1] Thanks to an original mall tour, "The Beautiful You: Celebrating The Good Life Shopping Mall Tour '87", Tiffany found commercial success;[2] both the single and the album peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and Billboard 200 charts, respectively. The singles, "Could've Been" and "I Saw Him Standing There", a cover version of The Beatles' "I Saw Her Standing There", followed soon after, with the former also claiming the number one position on the Billboard Hot 100.

    Although Tiffany's second album, Hold an Old Friend's Hand managed to chart in 1988, it failed to replicate the success of her debut album. 

  • Hi Bob,

    Any hints on how to open the pdf.

    I hover and click the mouse and get nothing :-(

    Roger

  • Thanks Bob! (and Ken, of course)

    Very quick response.

    KTVA rocks!

  • Awesome..... I've been working the course for a little over a month now and am mainly a guitar player. I sing iut of necessity,,,  ...  I have about 27 hours rehearsal hours in so far.  I have seen improvements for sure...At least I think so  :) ...  I'm 57 so we'll see how far my voice can go... ;)   Biggest problem for me is ensuring I am applying the KTVA teachings to my live performances.  But that will come.... Thanks for sharing... 
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,280Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    edited January 2014

    In my case, I've always had a pretty good ear for pitch.  That said, I've had to learn to actively LISTEN to my own voice at times, lest I let 'er drift.  If we aren't listening and comparing the pitch of our voice (in REAL-TIME) to the pitch and key of the song or scale we are singing, we can lose our way.  If we get off-track, we may not know how to get back onto the proper pitch.

    Also, if we aren't yet trained on a certain note, and try to attain it, we may miss the mark for that reason, as well.

    To truly CENTER on a note, we can't be a skoshe low or a skoshe high.  It's got to be as dead-on as best as our ears can tell.

    It is very adviseable to record all workouts and practices and to listen to the playback.  That way we can monitor our pitch accuracy and come to grips with any adjustments we need to make.  The recorder doesn't lie.

    If it says we're sharp or flat, we can use that information to turn our weaknesses into our strengths!

    Bob

  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,280Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro

    @blondiewales,

    Ken had a limited range.  He practiced and practiced and took lessons from many famous teachers, but his range did not improve much at all.  It took many years before he came upon the techniques that he now teaches in his courses.  It's obvious from watching his many videos that his range has greatly expanded. 

    Bob

  • RoojamRoojam Posts: 9Member
    I'm just starting Ken's Lesson Volume 1, and am looking forward to it. Having been awakened to some of the breathing support techniques just in the last year I can tell you that they make an amazing difference, and resulted in a big improvement in my range, tone, and stamina. A big challenge for me is consistency, to remember to apply them. You see I have always considered myself a guitarist-first, vocalist out of necessity. So now, by applying discipline, I'm confident that the world is my oyster, as they say.  ~Ready to start!
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,280Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro

    Gentlemen, and Ladies, You may start your engines!!!

    : ^ )

  • Asim_HussainAsim_Hussain Posts: 27Pro
    Welp, glad I could revive this thread with my persnickety nitpickery.
  • JoshuaJoshua Posts: 84Member, Enrolled
    I've got pitch problems, occasional but persistant. If you don't, good for you. I don't really understand my pitch issues except for some isolated points; let me enumerate.

    1. The most common - I just don't know the notes and I overestimate my ability to sing on the fly. This can be fixed - I just need to slow down and be less excitable
    2. The descending notes part A - I lost pitch descending because I don't use the same mechanism that got me up there, [open throat, diaphragm] to bring me back down (this one use to irritate the shit out of me because I didn't seem to have any control over it and didn't know why I was doing it) lead to part B
    3. The descending notes part B - you MUST MUST MUST remodify the notes on the way down to keep the throat open. Which means, use your tongue or how ever you feel the "heeyounga" feeling in the back of your throat. Otherwise you fall off, your brain engages and pitch fails.
    4. Missing High Notes - this one is still a bit of a trick for me. I think in getting to know my voice there are certain times where I take too much energy up and I do not release into my head voice. I have a great connection between head and chest on scales, but when it comes to words, I either get hung up on words, distortion or failing to release because I'm afraid it won't sound as cool. This one seems to be experience related and coaching related (in the sense that if I had someone listening they could probably guide me through it faster than I can learn it on my own)
    5. Lack of Pacing - I've discovered that pacing, as I play out in a live band every single weekend for 4 hours straight, has been an issue with Pitch. Ken helped me discover it - as I could sing a song I knew, very well, in a controlled environment with minimal if any pitch problems, but live I'd miss notes all over. Pacing with my dancing ended up being the issue and prepping the diaphragm to go grab those notes and still be ready for the next one proved to solve that.

    Besides all of that - my tone and vocal size is killer. Thanks KEN!
  • orexzaorexza Posts: 18Volume 1
    ken's story makes realize that if you believe and stick with it then impossible is not possible!
  • Quan ZhouQuan Zhou Posts: 11Pro

    Hi Bob,

    Any hints on how to open the pdf.

    I hover and click the mouse and get nothing :-(

    Roger


    *It would be nice if we can read that PDF file ;)*

  • Quan ZhouQuan Zhou Posts: 11Pro
    By far, KTVA is the only program I recommend to any of my friends who wanna sing or who wanna sing better. Although they are Chinese and most of them doesn't know English well.

    Vocal training environment in China is way more confused than North America. Most of them can't even sing like a pro, they can't even sing for a longer period of time without a single break. What they do is reading the textbook, explaining concepts and steal credit from famous singers who may just only had a photo with them. (Worse!)
  • Quan ZhouQuan Zhou Posts: 11Pro
    edited January 2014
    For a point of speaking, Chinese consumers are confused by marketing strategy easily :(
    (like my mom.... 
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,280Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    edited January 2014

    @Quantumjoe,

    The message near the top of this thread that starts out: "Ken Tamplin's Testimony Of His Singing Journey" is the text of the pdf file.    So many people were unable to open the pdf, I just copied and pasted it into this thread so everybody could read it.

    If you read the post, you read what's in the pdf.  The pdf must be corrupted or something.

    Anyway, it's a great story!!

     

    Bob

  • JeffDenmarkJeffDenmark Posts: 181Pro
    Yeah it Really is :)
  • johnjohn johnjohn Posts: 99Pro
    Pleased to report it's all working out very well for me!  :-)




  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,280Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro

    Congratulations on getting into a band, Kiki!

    There is a lot of fun and adventure to be had singing and/or playing in bands, especially singing. 

    Your friend the pianist was right.  You have to prepare yourself, so that when that moment comes along, you can jump on the train when it comes through town!

    Good for You!

    Bob

  • everdroneeverdrone Posts: 158Pro
    I am from Costa Mesa, California. I studied with Andy Boettner as well at his home studio in Newport Beach, brings back memories! My best friend in high school was Richard Tamplin, not sure if any relation to Ken Tamplin.

    I see Ken's quote above:

    "I started taking lessons from Andy Boettner (who claims he worked with Michael
    Jackson way before Seth Riggs claims Michael)."
  • kaulferskaulfers Posts: 296Pro
    A nice reminder.
  • bentkbentk Posts: 353Pro
    edited June 14
    Great story and inspiring.
    Ken has been going through quite the ride in his singing journey.

    Is he still active on the forum? I can imagine he is too busy for it.
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 11,280Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    To say Ken is busy is putting it mildly. His singing journey is still going full-tilt with activity.
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