Singing Forum by Ken Tamplin Vocal Academy
Hey Dudes and Divas!

Welcome to Singer Forum by Ken Tamplin Vocal Academy. Enrolled KTVA vocalists have access to the full singer forums, self-registered members have access to limited areas of the KTVA singing forum. Register to learn more.

To enroll in Ken Tamplin Vocal Academy Singing Lessons click here.

Vocal Range Discussion

Hi all, I thought I'd make a thread on vocal range since I find it to be an interesting topic. When I was 15 and first started singing my range was C2-D4, but over the past 15 years I've been able to improve that quite a bit. I don't mean this to be a "brag about your range" thread, just a fun topic.

My current range: F1 (subharmonic)-C#2 (lowest chest)-F#4 (highest chest)-Bb4 (mix)-G5 (head voice)

Comments

  • DiegoDiego Posts: 1,002Moderator, 2.0 PRO
    Sounds cool man!
    I used to be able to go up to a F4 in chest. Now I go to C5 chest and I can probably get my mix up to a E5 on a REALLY good day. Head voice can go all the way up to a F6, any more than that would just be my whistle, which I don't really consider usable or pleasant. I've always been able to have some solid low notes, I go down to C2.

    I don't REALLY care about range as much as I used to. But my overall range would be C2-F6.
  • Goggalor1990Goggalor1990 Posts: 10Member
    Nice! Yeah, as I get older I more care about what parts of my range are functional, not just tones I can make. I suppose I shouldn't include the F1 (yet) because I have just started learning and practicing subharmonics and I cannot get the F1 every time, nor do I consider the tone to be very pleasant. Same with my mix. I've just recently learned how to mix, and that Bb4 is very tenuous, as is the G5 in head voice. My favorite singer is David Phelps (a souther gospel singer with an incredible mix), so my goal has always been more around the A4-C5 range.
  • blondiewalesblondiewales Posts: 470Pro
    Range is interesting, but like Diego, I'm not nearly as interested in the extreme parts of it as I used to be.

    When I used to do more scales, I'd practice matching on my acoustic guitar. So I've only really practiced E2-C6. I know I can go quite a bit lower than E2, but the notes around C6 are eh... I'm not really great at the 6th octave or the high 5th octave.

    The majority of my singing is between C3-E5 or so, with some occasional outliers. I'm not actively working on the low and high ends of my range. Maybe I'll visit it some time in the future.

    The strongest part of my voice in the beginning was reinforced falsetto between C5-A5ish, so I've always kind of had that.

    I can do whistle voice pretty high, but I can't really control it well enough for it to be usable.
  • Goggalor1990Goggalor1990 Posts: 10Member
    I hear ya, I definitely think range should be, above all, functional. Does it sound good? Is it healthy technique? Is it resonant, sustainable, and consistent? These are all more important in actual singing imo. But as a just for fun thing, I am always curious to see just what our voices are capable of. They really are amazing.

    But something funny happened today: I decided to look into whistle register. I've always been convinced that, as a bass, my vocal folds could never thin out enough to do it. However, I watched a video from a vocal coach on YT today who promised, very confidently, that I "could do whistle voice in under 2 minutes". Of course I was very skeptical of this, but sure as heck I did it! I was flabergasted at how easy it actually was. I can consistently get to D-G6 now lol. As I said earlier, I think it's a party trick and I wouldn't use it in a song, but it's still kind of funny to me how easy it is compared to mixed voice and subharmonics.
Sign In or Register to comment.