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Relaxing throat

How do I fully relax my throat and sing without strain?

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  • Klaus_TKlaus_T Moderator, 2.0 PRO Posts: 1,814
    edited February 2020
    you need good posture and relaxation in most parts of your body, and you need to have proper diaphragmatic support. the support is the motor that does all the work, so that your throat can relax
  • MysteriousCatMysteriousCat Member Posts: 8
    How would I do that?
  • Klaus_TKlaus_T Moderator, 2.0 PRO Posts: 1,814
    did you watch Ken's video on support?
  • MysteriousCatMysteriousCat Member Posts: 8
    Yes but I didn’t really understand it...
  • Klaus_TKlaus_T Moderator, 2.0 PRO Posts: 1,814
    edited February 2020
    do you exercise regularily with Ken's videos? you don't necessarily need to know how support works to do that. you will discover useful things if you focus on the process. It took me more than a year on the paid course to have an idea how this works properly (maybe I am a bit slow lol). learning to sing properly is a long game. Ken explains everything as good as possible, the problem is that these sensations are elusive, because we have no words to describe what it is meant to feel like to support properly. the idea in general is that you reduce the air that comes out of your mouth by basically pretending you are breathing in (even though you actually do breathe out). read as much as you can about it, watch the videos, and KEEP PRACTICING!!! there were points when I thought I got it, just to later figure out it still wasn't the real deal. but if you keep at it, it will come.
  • Klaus_TKlaus_T Moderator, 2.0 PRO Posts: 1,814
    the best short attempt at explaining it in my own words:

    google images: look for "fireplace bellow"

    imagine it is full of air. it lies on the floor. gravity will do its thing, and the air will escape, eventually collapsing it.

    imagine you would use some resistance to keep it full, withstanding gravity. like holding the top handle in place so that it cannot come down. no air will come out as long as the top handle stays all the way up. but you could slowly move your hand down, allowing some air to come out, but not as fast as gravity wants it to.

    Ken does not say any of that, just to be sure. maybe it will help you though
  • MysteriousCatMysteriousCat Member Posts: 8
    Is it like controlling the airflow that goes out?
  • rodelrodel Member Posts: 7
    Klaus_T said:

    do you exercise regularily with Ken's videos? you don't necessarily need to know how support works to do that. you will discover useful things if you focus on the process. It took me more than a year on the paid course to have an idea how this works properly (maybe I am a bit slow lol). learning to sing properly is a long game. Ken explains everything as good as possible, the problem is that these sensations are elusive, because we have no words to describe what it is meant to feel like to support properly. the idea in general is that you reduce the air that comes out of your mouth by basically pretending you are breathing in (even though you actually do breathe out). read as much as you can about it, watch the videos, and KEEP PRACTICING!!! there were points when I thought I got it, just to later figure out it still wasn't the real deal. but if you keep at it, it will come.

    (Reducing air,Pretending breathing in) What do you mean by that?
    I think I get your point.
    When I tryna pretend that the air is coming into my mouth it sound more good that I use however Im getting lack of air. Is that the technique should I practice?

  • WigsWigs Moderator, 2.0 PRO, 3.0 Streaming Posts: 4,237
    Controlling air flow and using support are 2 different things but they both help each other. The kind of work side by side in the sense that the higher you are trying to sing the more support you will need while also cutting back your air to avoid blowing out your cords.

    The sensation of inhaling is a little more advanced because by the time you understand what it feels like to have good support and breath control after many months of training, the sensation of holding back air does indeed give the impression of inhaling the voice so to speak.
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