Home The Singer's Lobby

How do you Sing a Triplet of Notes?

JmanJman Member Posts: 13
edited June 22 in The Singer's Lobby
There's a common technique used that I call a Triplet of notes. It's a run of notes in one syllable, Ah-ah-ah. I don't know what the correct term is, but everyone does it. I've tried and it's hit and miss. If you know what I mean, can someone help me do this trick?

In the song Fooled Around and Fell in Love, the technique is sung by Elvin Bishop throughout the song, example: when he sings "... their tears left me cold as a sto-o-one.", and later in "...get out my book, and wri-i-ite down her name."

It has aspects of the Melisma, but it needs its own sub-category because it is only the three notes I'm trying, not the gospel style multiple notes.

Comments

  • WigsWigs Moderator, 2.0 PRO Posts: 2,358
    Are you talking about a basic vocal lick or something similar? Maybe pop the video in here with a time stamp of what you are talking about. You can just copy and past the URL.
  • wojtekwojtek Pro, 2.0 PRO Posts: 86
    Now that You mentioned it, u're right. I noticed it alot at the end phrases . This was one of my first "tricks" I used when I started singing/covering. Later I realised I over used them so now I am more conscious about using it :P
    In my case it came with time (dunno at which moment) - I sang songs and at some point I could sing those "tiny runs".
    Just practice it by itself - slow it down first, then speed it up, once u have it at normal speed, use it in a phrase (sentence from a song).
  • JmanJman Member Posts: 13
    Wigs said:

    Are you talking about a basic vocal lick or something similar? Maybe pop the video in here with a time stamp of what you are talking about. You can just copy and past the URL.

    It is a kind of vocal version of a guitar lick, but more like a very short riff - three notes only usually sung descending but also sung in undulation. I'll try putting the video in my post with time indications. Gimme a sec. And thanks for helping...
  • JmanJman Member Posts: 13
    wojtek said:

    Now that You mentioned it, u're right. I noticed it alot at the end phrases . This was one of my first "tricks" I used when I started singing/covering. Later I realised I over used them so now I am more conscious about using it :P
    In my case it came with time (dunno at which moment) - I sang songs and at some point I could sing those "tiny runs".
    Just practice it by itself - slow it down first, then speed it up, once u have it at normal speed, use it in a phrase (sentence from a song).


    Thanks wojtek. This technique does seem to appear a lot at the end of phrases. I sing covers too, and I often feel the audience is expecting those notes from me, as often they like a Feature of the song. I can do two notes, but it's not the same. I've actually done it accidentally. So that's just annoying! Your description "tiny runs" is a good one. I will try different speeds. Tha-aa-anks :smile:
  • JmanJman Member Posts: 13
    Here's a YouTube video of the song sung live with Elvin singing the "Triplets".



    The two examples I cited occur at <0.46> and then at <1.24> respectively.

    On reflection, this video is not a good example, because Elvin uses a lot Melisma and "runs" that go for more than three notes. But almost every song has these Triplet things in them.

    I have theorised that they usually come in threes, because three notes fits into one measure (I think it's called) naturally.

    It's kind of like a short vibrato, but the notes change pitch, are not the same.
  • JmanJman Member Posts: 13
    edited June 24
    Another example sung throughout All Out of Love, by Air Supply:



    With one "Triplet" sung in the line ending "I want you to come back, and carry me Home", so you hear "Ho-o-ome". Time is from <1.12>

    Try not to be distracted by the mesmerizing Afro.
  • WigsWigs Moderator, 2.0 PRO Posts: 2,358
    Thanks for the videos, in my mind its a lick or run (I dont know enough if there is a difference between the 2) and its pretty similar to a fast descending scale. Check out Kens video on practicing the lick for Tennessee whiskey, I reckon you could apply that here.
Sign In or Register to comment.