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MacBrookieMacBrookie 2.0 PRO Posts: 6
I have a question about range, main audio workouts, and songs. I am just starting the main audio workouts, and am trying/hoping to extend my range. My top note when I started was a C4, and I am able to hit a D4 now fairly easily. My question related to a couple of tunes I am doing with my duo: I Run To You (Lady A) and Wicked Game (Chris Isaak). Both of those tunes have a high note of F#4. When I sing those songs, I am using falsetto to hit those higher notes. Question: Should I stop singing songs where I switch to falsetto? I thought I remembered Ken saying something about singing in falsetto too much can actually hinder the improvement (high end of the range) of the chest voice range. I appreciate any tips or advice you all can give me. TIA!

Comments

  • Klaus_TKlaus_T 2.0 PRO Posts: 1,192
    i think you mean the part where Ken says that using head voice a lot can atrophy your chest voice?

    i don't think it will happen from a few high notes in a few songs. especially not if you do your daily exercises, which help build a strong chest voice , and make sure it is all well balanced. i wouldn't worry too much. after all, the bridging exercises are doing something similar (assuming that by falsetto you mean head voice)

    i would not sing in head voice for extended periods, until you are in that part of the course (i think that's vol 4)
  • MacBrookieMacBrookie 2.0 PRO Posts: 6
    Thank you Klaus. There are times that I can hit the E4 with my chest voice, but I think I am straining for it rather than stretching for it (not sure if I truly understand how to tell the difference). I have noticed when I sing that F#4, it sometimes cracks. And I'm never quite sure if I should back off with the air pressure, or give it more air. Still in the learning curve.
  • Klaus_TKlaus_T 2.0 PRO Posts: 1,192
    it will all come with practice
  • highmtnhighmtn Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro Posts: 14,885
    In the song Wicked Games, Chris Isaak deliberately cracks his voice every time he sing the "I" on the chorus.

    That's what gives it that slight yodel sound. Normally we don't want to crack, but on a song like that, you deliberately sing it in such a way as to get that little yodel every time it sings that line in the chorus.
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