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Is this guy a tenor or a high baritone?

So, I get a little bit confused when it comes to voice types, especially with voices that sound quite warm.

Is this singer (Nils Molin - Amaranthe/Dynazty) a tenor or a high baritone?

So a couple of me and my friend (none of us are musicians) were trying to figure out what sort of a vocal type this singer is

Some video clips:

Video 1

Video 2 - Jump to 18:40 for Amaranthine


Thanks for the help!

Comments

  • NicolasGralewiczNicolasGralewicz Member Posts: 39
    Without hearing him speak I'd have to say tenor. I'll show my work a bit...
    In that first clip he keeps going to that "low" note (which I believe is a D#3 but may be wrong). The note sounds low for him, like his voice is near the barrier before it breaks into a weaker unprojected low (as a tenor, that starts to happen to me at around the same note)
    In the second clip he pretty consistently hits belted high-ish notes (A#4 I believe) but doesn't really go higher than that, almost as if he's nearing his break into head voice. While there are various baritones who can do this pretty effortlessly (Think Maynard James Keenan), this guy has pretty similar qualities to his voice to some tenors that come to mind (Jared Leto, for example).
    Conclusion: He sounds like a tenor with a nice warm third octave range and strong belt in the high fourth octave
  • AlaeMortisAlaeMortis Member Posts: 9
    edited January 13
    Th

    Without hearing him speak I'd have to say tenor. I'll show my work a bit...
    In that first clip he keeps going to that "low" note (which I believe is a D#3 but may be wrong). The note sounds low for him, like his voice is near the barrier before it breaks into a weaker unprojected low (as a tenor, that starts to happen to me at around the same note)
    In the second clip he pretty consistently hits belted high-ish notes (A#4 I believe) but doesn't really go higher than that, almost as if he's nearing his break into head voice. While there are various baritones who can do this pretty effortlessly (Think Maynard James Keenan), this guy has pretty similar qualities to his voice to some tenors that come to mind (Jared Leto, for example).
    Conclusion: He sounds like a tenor with a nice warm third octave range and strong belt in the high fourth octave

    Thanks for the detailed analysis! That was informative, and I appreciate you taking the time to respond. There's a vocal coach on YouTube who sees him as a low tenor/high baritone - do these terms actually exist?

    Here's a clip of him talking (if that helps!) LINK
  • NicolasGralewiczNicolasGralewicz Member Posts: 39

    Th

    Without hearing him speak I'd have to say tenor. I'll show my work a bit...
    In that first clip he keeps going to that "low" note (which I believe is a D#3 but may be wrong). The note sounds low for him, like his voice is near the barrier before it breaks into a weaker unprojected low (as a tenor, that starts to happen to me at around the same note)
    In the second clip he pretty consistently hits belted high-ish notes (A#4 I believe) but doesn't really go higher than that, almost as if he's nearing his break into head voice. While there are various baritones who can do this pretty effortlessly (Think Maynard James Keenan), this guy has pretty similar qualities to his voice to some tenors that come to mind (Jared Leto, for example).
    Conclusion: He sounds like a tenor with a nice warm third octave range and strong belt in the high fourth octave

    Thanks for the detailed analysis! That was informative, and I appreciate you taking the time to respond. There's a vocal coach on YouTube who sees him as a low tenor/high baritone - do these terms actually exist?

    Here's a clip of him talking (if that helps!) LINK
    A high baritone exists, that's just a baritone who's higher on the spectrum. There are different types, most commonly "dramatic-baritone" and "lyric-baritone". Essentially, dramatic means low, lyric means high. Same goes for all voice types. I'd agree that he's either a high baritone or low tenor :)
  • AlaeMortisAlaeMortis Member Posts: 9

    Th

    Without hearing him speak I'd have to say tenor. I'll show my work a bit...
    In that first clip he keeps going to that "low" note (which I believe is a D#3 but may be wrong). The note sounds low for him, like his voice is near the barrier before it breaks into a weaker unprojected low (as a tenor, that starts to happen to me at around the same note)
    In the second clip he pretty consistently hits belted high-ish notes (A#4 I believe) but doesn't really go higher than that, almost as if he's nearing his break into head voice. While there are various baritones who can do this pretty effortlessly (Think Maynard James Keenan), this guy has pretty similar qualities to his voice to some tenors that come to mind (Jared Leto, for example).
    Conclusion: He sounds like a tenor with a nice warm third octave range and strong belt in the high fourth octave

    Thanks for the detailed analysis! That was informative, and I appreciate you taking the time to respond. There's a vocal coach on YouTube who sees him as a low tenor/high baritone - do these terms actually exist?

    Here's a clip of him talking (if that helps!) LINK
    A high baritone exists, that's just a baritone who's higher on the spectrum. There are different types, most commonly "dramatic-baritone" and "lyric-baritone". Essentially, dramatic means low, lyric means high. Same goes for all voice types. I'd agree that he's either a high baritone or low tenor :)
    Ah ok, cool! Thanks for taking the time to answer my question : ) I learned a lot!
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