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Bring back the 70's great rock.

GoldtaffGoldtaff Posts: 25Pro
Lol whilst being born in 1981 the only way my mother could get me to sleep was put music on and I was as happy as sand boy. I've loved music since then but got brought up on 70's music mostly and cowboy films lol. I love all the rock music and unlike today's pop bull industry I loved that era when song writers wrote there own music and got somewhere through blood sweat and tears. Through years of deadication and learning there game of mastery.

Comments

  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 14,523Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    There are tons of songs from that era that are still quite popular.  Led Zep, The Eagles, Bad Company come to mind.  Great songs with great vocals.
  • ragnarragnar Posts: 410Pro
    edited January 2015
    There's plenty of fantastic rock music out there today, and probably loads more people now who have put in those years of dedication and mastery. Some of my absolute favorite bands are Zep, Cream, The Who etc. - but getting stuck in some fairytale fantasy about the 70s will at best land you a cover gig for those who were young in that era.
    The music industry was just as much bull back then as it is now. Just ask all the Motown legends who got ripped off by the labels and left for broke.

    My apologies if that sounds harsh, I'm too busy to sugarcoat things atm.
  • GoldtaffGoldtaff Posts: 25Pro
    I was referring to all the fake pop artists the people who buy others songs and pass on as its there own. The lip synced artists.
  • ragnarragnar Posts: 410Pro
    Aretha Franklin and that whole era of singers who were big in the 70s had teams of studio musicians writing songs for them. Does that mean they're all fake too?
    It's obviously true that the charts today are dominated by shallow hypersexual hip-hop crap, but cultural zeitgeists always come and go don't they? The 80s had disco, synth-pop and cock-rock which were all arguably equally lame.
    And it's not like every hit single by The Beatles/Stones/etc. were profound lyrical masterpieces anyways.

    Yeah lip-syncing is musical bankruptcy if done consistently, but I'm pretty sure someone like Beyonce has more skill for entertainment in her left buttocks than we all do combined. (And I don't even like Beyonce).
    Exhibit A:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tq8tK1rGpog


  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 14,523Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    edited January 2015

    Oh, by the way, Welcome @Goldtaff.  I see this is your first post.  Nice to meet you! 

    Nice video of a talented present-day artist, @ragnar

    We all have our preferences, and it's OK.  I guess it's when we say that we don't like something that maybe other people do like, that we may step on somebody's toes.

    Speaking of lip-syncing and Aretha, did you hear about how much trouble she had filming her Think musical number for the Blues Brothers movie?  She had a lot of trouble with that, because she only knew how to really sing... making her lips match a recording was troublesome for her.

    Cream did not write all of their songs, and they were one of my favorites, and I still like to hear their recordings.  I don't listen to Cream very often, but when I hear one of their tunes playing, I may stop what I'm doing and listen, because their style was very unique, and they were trendsetters even though their basis was in old blues roots.  The Beatles wrote a TON of music, but started out doing covers.  Zep did not write all of their tunes, either, and the list could go on. 

    Good songs are good songs, regardless of who wrote the song.  How it is presented makes a difference.  What is a "Good Song" to me may not be so hot in someone else's opinion.  That's OK too.  The world won't conform to my standards for some reason.

    There are good artists from before the 70's and 80's and there are good artists now.  In the present, we may hear more of the not-so-great, because time and memory have not yet filtered them out, and we may find them quite annoying in the present if we don't happen to care for them.  I was quite troubled by the amount of disco in the late 70's.  Now it's good for a lark.  It was torture then.

    Some of today's artists will still be popular or their songs will be played 45 or 50 years from now, like the Beatles, Stones, and others we could list.  It's just a flash in the pan, if you use a more historical clock, but that is a long time in contemporary music.  Many others will be forgotten by then, and some will look back on this golden age of creativity in the 2010's, the good old days...  when music was good. 

    With over 5,000 subscribers to this forum, we may sometimes have varying tastes.  That's OK.   


    Bob

  • ragnarragnar Posts: 410Pro
    Good post Bob. I think you are right on point throughout. I loved the Blues Brothers movie but I hadn't heard that Aretha anecdote, must have been a weird situation.
    I completely agree with you about Cream's unique style. They've always slipped between my musical cracks a bit but I've been listening to them a lot recently. How much of that do you think we can attribute to Ginger Baker? He sounds almost ethereal on some songs, I'm sure you must love him as a drummer yourself.

    By the way here's a documentary on the making of Disraeli Gears that I thought was cool.
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 14,523Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    edited January 2015

    @ragnar,

    I saw Cream back in the day.  The first time I saw them, I had never even heard of them.  I went to see Vanilla Fudge and my friends told me I would like Cream, too.  They were quite good.  Then they played Toad, and my friends looked at me as if I knew what was coming.  I didn't.  Ginger started playing his solo, and I'm like, so what, I can do that... Fifteen minutes later, he's still building his solo, and I'm like, heh, heh, well, he is pretty good...  I ended up modeling my playing after him, probably more than any other drummer.  I also heard Jimi Hendrix a few times, and loved Mitch Mitchell's playing style on their recordings, but he never sounded that good to me live.  Live, Mitchell's playing was always a mushy wash, and indistinct, unlike the recordings.

    A lot of the bands I played in back then were playing tons of Cream and Hendrix covers.  When Zeppelin came out, we were doing all of those long album cuts, as well.  I saw Zeppelin live a few times.  Plant had a hoarse voice each time I saw them and that was a disappointment, but Bonham always delivered.  His solo wasn't as long and polyrhythmic as Baker's but it was still very impressive.  Bonham also had a great feel and drive for solid backing of the Zeppelin machine when they would crank it up.

    Cream was unique in the aspect that the drummer really set the music into a different type of drive from all of the other popular band's drummers.  Baker's riffs all had a more tribal African feel to them.  Baker spent some time in Africa studying tribal rhythms, so the story goes. In Cream, they were all three playing like madmen, yet very methodical.  It was a synergy that had a life of its own.

    I can't imagine Cream having the kind of power they had with anyone other than Ginger Baker in the middle of Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton's fusion.  The three of those guys playing together were nothing short of awesome.  None of them were replaceable. 

    Thanks for posting the video, @ragnar.  I had to stop what I was doing and enjoy some really great music.  I like what Ahmet Ertegun had to say at the very end. 

    Bob

  • ragnarragnar Posts: 410Pro
    Wow. Sitting here pondering over my medical books in the musical wasteland that is Denmark, that sounds so much more exciting to have been able to see Cream/Hendrix/Zep etc. live haha :)
    Were you traveling around gigging in your youth or did they just happen to come by your local area?

    I've heard that about Plant a lot unfortunately that he was more miss than hit in a live setting which is a shame. It seems like the vast majority of vocal gods from that era - and almost all eras really - do these crazy gymnastics in the studio and kill themselves on stage. 
    I mean being in my 20s now and previously only having heard Eric Clapton in the autumn of his career, I was really shocked to hear what a lovely bluesy voice he had back then. Bruce, may he rest in peace, seemed to have held on to his vocal ability much better though.
    Just goes to show that the rhythm sections were the unsung heroes of rock n' roll. I mean who in the general public has ever even heard of John Paul Jones? Crazy.

    I actually remember hearing someone talking about how the blues - having had it's origins amongst the slaves of America - will have inevitably had a big basis in african tribal culture. I'm not sure if that's historically accurate or just an anecdote, but I wonder if someone like Baker would have thought the same.

    You're very welcome @highmtn. I just stumbled upon the documentary a few days ago myself, found it very interesting to say the least.
  • GoldtaffGoldtaff Posts: 25Pro
    Hi nice to meet you both too. I'm just disappointed with the production factory type of music that's been going on with the likes of X factor and stuff like that. There are great artists out there today I agree but the modern fad artists seems to be an ever increasing number.
  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 14,523Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro

    @Goldtaff,

    Back in the day, we were disappointed too when The Monkees and the Archies came out and a lot of people actually believed they were real bands.  Then there was the Wrecking Crew, who played all of the musical tracks for bands like the Beach Boys, the Righteous Brothers, the Four Tops, Simon and Garfunkle, Sonny and Cher, and many more.  They were a secret corps of very talented musicians who played all of the studio parts for hundreds of hits of the 60's and 70's.  I actually have a lot of respect for Hal Blaine, the main drummer for the Wrecking Crew.  I had no idea at the time that he was the drummer on so many songs I played to in cover bands.  Likewise,Carol Kaye, one of the main bass players for the Wrecking Crew, came up with some of the greatest bass line grooves of an era that was loaded with hit records.  We didn't know of the existence of the Wrecking Crew back then.  We were listening to them every day.

    @ragnar...  At the time these concerts were happening, I too lived in a desolate area.  They had no concerts in the state I lived in at that time.  We would drive almost 200 miles to see concerts in Dallas, Texas.  It was that or nothing.  The only notable exception to that came when Jimi Hendrix played a concert in my home town, at the university basketball court.   We sat on the floor, and at that concert, I was in the front row.  The stage was just a riser about a foot or so off the ground.  I was right in front of his microphone.  Other times I saw him, we were much further away, in the Dallas coliseum, where most of the other shows I saw took place. The Vanilla Fudge/Cream Concert was in a smaller venue, the Texas State Fair Grounds auditorium.  We were in the balcony there, but one of my friends got separated from us, and ended up sitting front-row-center, where they had a single seat

    Bob

  • rcrosierrcrosier Posts: 275Pro
    edited January 2015
    I just watched a video about Carol Kaye last night... Link here:


  • ragnarragnar Posts: 410Pro
    Love the stories @highmtn, and yeah I've hitchhiked to Germany quite a few times but you're right. I should definitely be more committed to go see shows.

    By the way, am I the only one who can't click on the images to see them in larger form?
  • GoldtaffGoldtaff Posts: 25Pro

    Got to agree with Ragner these stories and insights are really cool could listen to more be nice to hear all of your experiences :)

  • highmtnhighmtn Posts: 14,523Administrator, Moderator, Enrolled, Pro
    edited January 2015

    @Goldtaff, @ragnar,

    Here are links to better images:

    http://www.pictureandposter.com/jimi-hendrix-1968-14-x-22-concert-poster

    Click on the poster to enlarge.


    image

    image

    image

    image

    Here is an article on the wrecking crew.  Click on the embedded audio file, which contains a montage of songs Hal Blaine was the drummer on.  I recognize every one of them.

    http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2012/04/20/musicians-wrecking-crew


    More great Wrecking Crew stories:

    http://www.jackaboutguitars.com/the-wrecking-crew-film


    http://rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=34093


  • ragnarragnar Posts: 410Pro
    Awesome. That is one big team right there!
  • jinnyjinny Posts: 20Member
    edited February 2015
    this song is one of my favs..

    [video] [/video]


  • rcrosierrcrosier Posts: 275Pro
    Wow... you're killing me... I remember playing this a few hundred times when I was young...
  • jinnyjinny Posts: 20Member
    another one of my top favs...

    [video] [/video]
  • rcrosierrcrosier Posts: 275Pro
    They had a bunch of awesome tunes!
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